Common Mistake On Traffic Laws

Sometimes even the safest drivers cross the line between legal and illegal driving. While there are a lot of traffic laws that most people agree need to be followed at all times (like stopping at a red light), there are others that are broken by seemingly everyone. When you’re in a hurry, it can be tempting to push the limits of what’s legal, but it’s important to remember that these laws exist for your safety and the safety of others.

1. Speeding

Many people seem to take speed limits as “suggestions” and may get frustrated when the car in front of them is actually going the correct speed. When you’re running late, going 30 mph can feel like 10 mph, but you’ll be even later if you get pulled over.

Conversely, driving too slowly can also be dangerous, especially on the highway. Not all states have speed minimums, but if you live in a state that does, it’s important to make sure that you are at least going the minimum, when possible.

2. Rolling through stop signs

Running a stop sign is a terrible idea because it’s extremely dangerous (not to mention illegal). Although most people are aware of that, some consistently roll though stop signs. Taking a quick look around then rolling through a stop sign when you think the coast is clear can seem like a good idea. Take the time it takes. Observe the intersection closely. Accidents occur frequently because of inattention. Rolling a stop sign can turn into an expensive mistake.

3. Failure to stop for pedestrians

This happens too frequently. It almost seems that people aren’t even aware that pedestrians usually have the right-of-way. If pedestrians are waiting to cross at a crosswalk, you must wait for them to cross before you drive.

4. Failure to signal

Turn signals are an important means of communication we have with other drivers. They allow other drivers to know they need to slow down and give you room to change lanes or know which way you’re going to turn. Signal your intent long before you take action. Flipping on your turn signal while you’re in the middle of changing lanes or once you’ve already started turning is not sufficient notice to other drivers.

5. Illegal turns

Always be aware of your state’s laws regarding U-turns. Some states allow U-turns while others don’t. Pay attention to all posted signs, as there may be some areas where they aren’t permitted. Also look for signs at traffic lights, because right turns on red may be prohibited at some intersections.

6. Texting while driving

With varying degrees of restrictions, it is illegal to text and drive in almost every state in the U.S. Many states also have other laws regarding distracted driving, such as only talking on the phone using a hands-free device. Always be aware of the laws in your state regarding texting and hands-free devices. However, even if there are no laws against texting while driving, it is still a safety risk.

When you’re in a rush, traffic laws can feel like an inconvenience, but they are designed to keep you and everyone else safe.

 

Posted in Law

Tips To Hire DWI Lawyers

The US law strictly prohibits anyone to drive a motor vehicle when he is intoxicated with alcohol. In some states, this violation is called Driving Under the Influence or DUI while in other places, this is known as Driving While Intoxicated or DWI. Drivers who are arrested as DUI or DWI suspects usually hire the services of a certified DWI lawyer. This attorney can defend them in related cases, and also represent them during legal procedures.

A DWI lawyer is, primarily, an attorney with the license to practice law where the suspected offense happened. Just as other legal professionals specialize in cases involving personal injuries or domestic violence, DWI lawyers choose to focus on cases concerning people that have been accused of drunk driving. In general, this means that these lawyers are well versed with the language as well as the application of the DWI laws of the state. They are confident that they can successfully defend their client and win the case.

A county deputy or police officer who is on duty can assess whether or not a driver is too drunk to drive, based on his/her behavior on the street. While the traffic is on a stop, the officer can let the driver undergo a couple of field tests to determine his/her response time, coordination and coherence. When the officer finds out that the driver is too drunk with alcohol to drive properly and safely, the driver will be asked to puff into a breathalyzer. This machine has the capacity to measure the amount of alcohol in the bloodstream of an individual.

In case the test results fall in between.08% to.10%, the driver can face DWI charges and can be brought to a police station to undertake a blood test. He can be detained in jail from a few hours to a number of days, until he/she appears for the first time before a judge. By this time, the suspect can hire the services of a DWI lawyer to represent him/her during the trial, and in the meantime, arrange for his/her release before the said date.

The process of establishing the legal impairment of a person while driving may be simple. However, it is usually more challenging to successfully prosecute a DWI suspect. In this regard, a DWI lawyer has to study the necessary documents and test results related to the case. In addition to this, he will invite certain people for questioning, such as the suspect, possible witnesses, arresting officer and lab technicians to know the chain of events, and gather evidence.

While the case is on trial, a DWI lawyer can interrogate the officer regarding the legality of the arrest, and perhaps ask if he has clearly pointed out the rights of the defendants, as an example. The field tests that showed intoxication may have been carried out under unfavorable conditions or uneven ground. During the traffic stop, the defendant may have been over fatigued or suffering from health issues, like hypoglycemia or diabetes.

 

The Differences Between DWIs Versus DUIs

It is scientifically proven that any amount of alcohol consumption affects your coordination, mental thought process, and reaction time, which all affect your ability to safely operate a motor vehicle. Many states, including the state of Missouri, have a zero tolerance law that strictly mandates how the police handle certain situations.

What does Zero Tolerance Mean?

A zero tolerance law means that anyone pulled over driving a vehicle whose blood-alcohol level is over the legal limit – in Missouri’s case of .08% – will automatically be charged with a criminal ticket.

This law also severely penalizes anyone under the legal age of 21 caught driving under any percent influence of alcohol or drugs. Anyone under 21 who receives this charge could automatically lose their license and be required to go to traffic school.

The Different Offenses

When charged with this offense, there are several different terms that could be used on your criminal ticket. These are: DWI, which stands for Driving While Intoxicated; DUI, which means Driving Under the Influence; and DUID, which stands for driving under the influence of drugs.

Although each of these charges is fairly similar to the other two, as they all encompass some form of driving illegally while impaired by alcohol and/or drugs, the level of severity of the charge differs in certain states. If you live in an area of jurisdiction that classifies these charges separately, here is what the different charges could mean for you:

The DWI

The DWI, or Driving While Intoxicated, is the most serious charge of the three. This charge indicates that the offender experienced obvious impairment, and his or her blood-alcohol level was well above the legal limit.

This charge is very difficult to reduce to a DUI with a plea bargain, as the offender completely disregarded the law and endangered other people.

The DUI

The DUI, or Driving Under the Influence, is a slightly less severe charge than a DWI. The legal technicality of the term DUI indicates that the person charged with this offense had a lower level of impairment than someone charged with a DWI.

This charge means that when the offender was pulled over, he or she was only slightly above the legal blood-alcohol limit. This charge is more likely to be reduced with a plea bargain; however, it is highly unlikely that the offender will walk away scot-free.

The DUID

The DUID, or Driving Under the Influence of Drugs, is slightly more difficult to categorize as many states have different laws and regulations. No matter what state you are in, it is illegal to operate a vehicle under the age of 21 with a traceable amount of drugs in your system.

Some states have a “per se” law that makes it illegal to operate any type of vehicle with a detectable amount of drugs in your body, while others have a zero tolerance law that could result in a suspended license. Although Missouri does not have this law, surrounding states such as Illinois do.

Any type of impaired driving is extremely dangerous and can harm yourself and other people. No matter what type of charge you receive, it is very important to acquire legal help. A lawyer is much more capable and qualified to deal with these charges than you are, and he or she has a much better likelihood of reducing a charge.

 

Information About Construction Zone Traffic Law and Ticket Types

During the summer months, construction zones can make traveling by car a hassle. Not only do construction zones increase your travel time as you have to slow down to pass through them, but it can also create traffic jams in typically un-congested areas.

Despite how inconvenient it may be, traffic construction is necessary to keep the motorways in adequate condition. Although it may be frustrating to travel through construction zones, it is important to follow the traffic laws as it protects other motorists and the construction workers as well.

Distracted Driving Laws

Distracted driving laws vary from state to state, and when traveling through multiple states, it’s important to know and understand the laws in the surrounding states.

One of the biggest distracted driving culprits is cell phone use. In many states, cell phone use is illegal when driving. Even if a state may not prohibit cell phone use in normal areas, construction zones usually have additional restrictions on phone usage to reduce the likelihood of distracted driving.

Construction Zone Tickets

There are multiple types of tickets that you can receive in construction zones, and the most common ticket is a speeding ticket. With the reduction of speed limits for extended lengths of the road – and some areas that are poorly marked – it becomes difficult for you to know where a construction zone begins or ends.

There are two main types of speed limit reductions in construction zones. The first is an actual, photo-enforced speed limit, work zone reduction. This is a newer development that has made its way into the work zones as states have updated their laws to use speed cameras and radar guns to catch speeding motorists. This speed reduction is enforced throughout the entirety of the area, even if workers are not present.

The second type of speed limit reduction is a stated limit that applies only when workers are present. There are usually flashing lights or indicators on the speed limit signs that indicate when workers are present, which helps drivers know when to abide by the speed limit. These limits could also be photo enforced, but it is more common that a police officer is there to ensure that motorists follow the speed limit.

Handling a Ticket

If you have received a ticket in a working area, you will be subjected to a higher fine and steeper punishment. You will also most likely have to appear in court and could receive a large penalty for endangering motorists and workers.

Dealing with these types of ticket can be very difficult, and it is best to find someone who regularly handles these situations. Find a lawyer who knows and understands the specific traffic laws for your area, and let them work on your behalf.

From the beginning, the Traffic Law Headquarters has subscribed to a different philosophy-client satisfaction is #1 priority. Since the establishment of the Traffic Law Headquarters in 2000, we’ve earned a loyal client following as a result of hard work, high quality results, and reasonable attorney fees. Sixteen years later our philosophy hasn’t changed! e represent clients throughout the State of Missouri for traffic tickets, DWI offenses, criminal cases, appeals to the Department of Revenue concerning driver license suspensions (5 year denials, 10 year denials, etc.), arrest and criminal record expungements, reversing traffic guilty pleas, and injury cases.